Math Class: Sneakerhead Statistics Defined

These are the seven main statistics that we use throughout our work.  As we add more stats and terms we will update this list.

  1. Average Deadstock Price:  The average sales price of all deadstock, mens sneakers sold on eBay over the past 12 months.  We’ve removed fakes, outliers and auctions with multiple pairs.
  2. Total Sold:  The total number of mens sneakers sold on eBay over the past 12 months (deadstock and used).  We’ve removed fakes, outliers and auctions with multiple pairs.
  3. Price Volatility:  A measure of how much we can expect deadstock price to fluctuate – it provides an average price range.  A sneaker with an average DS price of $200 and a Price Volatility of 40% means that we can expect the price to be between $120 and $280.  Price Volatility is calculated as standard deviation divided by average price.
  4. Resell Price Premium:  A measure of how much more a sneaker sells for in the aftermarket, as compared to its retail price.  A sneaker which retailed at $150 and now has an average price of $300 on eBay would have a Resell Price Premium of 100%.  This is also known as “margin” or “markup”.
  5. Deadstock Price Premium:  A measure of how much more a deadstock sneaker sells for, as compared to a used pair.  A sneaker with a DS Price Premium of 100% means that the average price of a DS pair sells for twice as much as a used pair.
  6. Deadstock %:  The percentage of deadstock pairs on eBay – as opposed to used.   A Deadstock % of 60% means that 60% of all mens sneakers on eBay are DS, and 40% are used.
  7. Sold %:  The percentage of eBay auctions which ended in a sale – as opposed to those which ended with no sale.  This provides a snapshot of market availability:  the higher the Sold %, the fewer pairs sitting on virtual shelves.
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7 comments

  1. […] attempts to turn sneaker head numbers into data. Campless sneakerhead data defines terms used to gather stats on sneakers. Sneaker data can be assessed by seven different […]

  2. […] IMPACT:  When reviewing the Campless Price Guide, which now includes sales volume and price volatility, remember that higher volume and lower volatility means you should have higher confidence in the exact price listed.  Lower volume and higher volatility are indicators to expect a larger range around the price listed.  For more information on volume, volatility and other statistics we use to extract meaning from sneaker data, see: “Sneakerhead Statistics Defined“. […]

  3. […] New Statistics:  “Volume” (or “Sold”) is the total number of deadstock mens sneakers that were sold during the relevant time period.  These are the sales used to calculate average price.  “Price Volatility” (or “Vlty.”) is standard deviation divided by average price.  Volume and volatility should be used as a reference when reviewing price.  Higher volume and lower volatility should lead to greater confidence in the exact price listed.  Lower volume and higher volatility are indicators to expect a wider range around the average.  For more information on these and other Campless statistics, see “Sneakerhead Statistics Defined“. […]

  4. When u count all completed auctions to see if something sold or not iz not accurate because most of the thingz I list I end the item to either sell locally or directly thru PayPal to avoid fees but if u go according to ebay it will appear as if the item didn’t sell when in reality I get more $$ in my pocket from the sales.Im sure I am not the only 1 doing that also so I wouldn’t rely on that stay but that my opinion as well as fact based off of my personal experiences selling on ebay…Hope this helps u out & Nice article my friend….Good Luck to U!!

    1. That’s a great point. We are certainly aware of that, just like we are aware that many transactions take place off of eBay entirely, but all we can see with the eBay data are the number of transactions actually sold on eBay. Your example – sales which take place offline – means that total sales is a lot higher than we report. That’s OK. The relevant number is not just the sale of a single shoe, but the comparison of sales across all shoes. On average, all shoes deal with the same issue (some sales taking place offline), so it still provides an excellent indicator of relative sales volume, which is what’s most important. You don’t really care if “shoe X” sold 1000 or 1100 as much as you care that it sold twice as many as “shoe Y”.

  5. […] If you need a refresher on what these stats mean, you can always revisit “Math Class: Sneakerhead Statistics Defined“. […]

  6. […] For more info on resell premium and other Campless data terms see “Math Class:  Sneakerhead Statistics Defined“. […]

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